NoahGallowaysDentallyDangerousDancing

For anyone else, having a tooth accidentally knocked out while practicing a dance routine would be a very big deal. But not for Dancing With The Stars contestant Noah Galloway. Galloway, an Iraq War veteran and a double amputee, took a kick to the face from his partner during a recent practice session, which knocked out a front tooth. As his horrified partner looked on, Galloway picked the missing tooth up from the floor, rinsed out his mouth, and quickly assessed his injury. “No big deal,” he told a cameraman capturing the scene.

Of course, not everyone would have the training — or the presence of mind — to do what Galloway did in that situation. But if you’re facing a serious dental trauma, such as a knocked out tooth, minutes count. Would you know what to do under those circumstances? Here’s a basic guide.

If a permanent tooth is completely knocked out of its socket, you need to act quickly. Once the injured person is stable, recover the tooth and gently clean it with water — but avoid grasping it by its roots! Next, if possible, place the tooth back in its socket in the jaw, making sure it is facing the correct way. Hold it in place with a damp cloth or gauze, and rush to the dental office, or to the emergency room if it’s after hours or if there appear to be other injuries.

If it isn’t possible to put the tooth back, you can place it between the cheek and gum, or in a plastic bag with the patient’s saliva, or in the special tooth-preserving liquid found in some first-aid kits. Either way, the sooner medical attention is received, the better the chances that the tooth can be saved.

When a tooth is loosened or displaced but not knocked out, you should receive dental attention within six hours of the accident. In the meantime, you can rinse the mouth with water and take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication (such as ibuprofen) to ease pain. A cold pack temporarily applied to the outside of the face can also help relieve discomfort.

When teeth are broken or chipped, you have up to 12 hours to get dental treatment. Follow the guidelines above for pain relief, but don’t forget to come in to the office even if the pain isn’t severe. Of course, if you experience bleeding that can’t be controlled after five minutes, dizziness, loss of consciousness or intense pain, seek emergency medical help right away.

And as for Noah Galloway:  In an interview a few days later, he showed off his new smile, with the temporary bridge his dentist provided… and he even continued to dance with the same partner!

If you would like more information about dental trauma, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Trauma & Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries.”

By George Salem and Associates, PC
October 31, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures

Has tooth loss affected your smile? If you've lost one or more teeth, dental implants offer an dental implantsattractive, effective way to improve your smile. The dentists at Dr. George Salem and Associates in Braintree, MA, explain how implants can fill the gaps in your smile.

Implants offer a complete restoration option

If you've been considering your restoration choices, you know that dentures and dental bridges only replace teeth above the gum line. Dental implants are the only option that replaces your entire tooth, starting at the roots. Implants consist of small titanium posts that are placed in the spaces that your roots once occupied during a minor oral surgical procedure.

Your implants wouldn't be very effective if they just rested loosely in your jawbone. Without a firm connection to your jawbone, they wouldn't be able to support a dental crown and would wiggle every time you took a bite. Luckily, implants are made of titanium, a metal that bonds to bone. Once you receive your implant, it only takes about three to six months for bonding to occur. When your dentist determines that the implant has completely fused to your jawbone, it will be topped with a dental crown in our Braintree office. The crown closes the gap in your smile and also allows you to chew normally.

The unique benefits of dental implants

Dental implants offer a few very special advantages, such as:

  • Versatility: Implant can replace any number of missing teeth. They're an excellent choice if you wear dentures and are looking for a more comfortable, stable restoration option.
  • Excellent Comfort and Biting Power: Gum irritation can sometimes occur if you have dentures or bridges, particularly if they don't fit well. Irritation isn't a problem with dental implants. Because the parts of your new tooth act as one unit, there's nothing to rub against your gums when you take a bite.
  • Longevity: Dentures must be relined, rebased or replaced every 10 to 15 years. Bridges also must be replaced after 10 to 15 years. With proper care, dental implants can last a lifetime, although you may need to replace the dental crown.

Close the gaps in your smile with dental implants. Call your dentists at Dr. George Salem and Associates in Braintree, MA, at (781) 843-0660 to schedule an appointment.

ConsideraRemovablePartialDentureasaTemporarySolutionAfterToothLoss

In an ideal situation, you would transition from a missing tooth to a permanent replacement with as little time in between as possible. Unfortunately, reality can intrude on the best of intentions.

For example, dental implants are one of the best ways to regain the form and function of a lost tooth. They are, however, initially expensive, especially if you’re replacing multiple teeth. Your financial ability may force you to wait — which means you need a solution now, if only temporarily.

Fortunately, a removable partial denture (RPD) could be the temporary solution you’re looking for. There are various kinds and all quite affordable; one of the more versatile is a flexible version made of a form of nylon. Due to its thermoplasticity, the nylon is quite pliable when heated and can be easily molded into a denture base with attaching prosthetic teeth. They’re comfortable to wear and attach to the remaining teeth at the gum line with flexible, finger-like clasps.

 RPDs are designed as a transitional replacement between tooth loss and a permanent restoration such as implants, bridges or permanent dentures. Their light weight, comfort and affordability also make them tempting to consider as a permanent replacement.

They do, however, have some drawbacks that make them less desirable for long-term use. They weren’t designed for relining or repair, so such efforts can be difficult. The clasp holding them in place may also trap food and bacteria that increase the risk of dental disease to the gums and remaining teeth. You can minimize some of these weaknesses by properly cleaning and maintaining the RPD, and taking them out at night to inhibit the growth of bacteria while you sleep.

Mainly, though, you should primarily consider a RPD as a temporary bridge between lost teeth and a permanent restoration. To that end, we’ll work with you to develop a treatment and finance plan that will help you achieve a more permanent and satisfying restoration.

If you would like more information on teeth replacement options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Flexible Partial Dentures.”

October 14, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
NewSeasonNewToothbrush

October brings fall leaves, pumpkins — and National Dental Hygiene Month. As you change your summer clothes for a fall wardrobe, it may also be time to change your toothbrush for a new one. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends replacing your toothbrush every three to four months. If that sounds like a lot, just think: This small but very important tool gets a lot of use!

If you brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes each time as recommended by the ADA, that’s two hours of brushing action in one month. Three to four months of twice-daily brushing makes for six to eight hours of brushing time, or a couple hundred uses. This is all an average toothbrush can take before it stops doing its job effectively.

Toothbrush bristles are manufactured to have the right amount of give, tapering, and end-rounding for optimal cleaning. When new, a toothbrush can work its way around corners and between teeth to remove dental plaque. Old bristles, however, lose the flexibility needed to reach into nooks and crannies for a thorough cleaning. Worn bristles may curl, fray or break — and can scratch your gums or tooth enamel. A toothbrush with stiff, curled bristles does not leave your mouth feeling as clean. This may lead to brushing too often or too hard, which is bad for your gums.

A good rule of thumb is to replace your toothbrush every season — unless you see signs that you need a new one sooner. For example, if you wear braces, you may have to replace your toothbrush more frequently since brushing around braces puts more wear and tear on the brush.

For healthy teeth and gums, make sure your primary oral hygiene tool is in tip-top shape. Taking care of the little things now can avoid inconvenient and expensive dental problems later. Don’t forget to schedule regular professional dental cleanings, and be sure to ask if you have any questions about your dental hygiene routine at home. To learn more about the importance of good oral hygiene, read “Daily Oral Hygiene: Easy Habits for Maintaining Oral Health” and “Dental Hygiene Visit: A True Value in Dental Healthcare” in Dear Doctor magazine.

4CausesforGumRecessionandWhatWeCanDoAboutIt

If you’ve noticed some of your teeth seem to be “longer” than you remembered, it’s not because they’ve grown. Rather, your gums have shrunk back or receded to expose more of the underlying tooth.

It’s not just unattractive — gum recession could lead to severe consequences like bone or tooth loss. But before we begin treatment we need to find out why it happened. Knowing the true cause will help us put together the right treatment plan for your situation.

Here are 4 of the most common causes for gum recession and what we can do about them.

The kind of gum tissues you have. There are two kinds of risk factors: those you can control and those you can’t. Because you inherited the trait from your parents, your gum tissue thickness falls into the latter category. Although there are degrees within each, gum tissues are generally classified as either thick or thin. If you have thin tissues, you’re more susceptible to gum recession — which means we’ll need to be extra vigilant about caring for your gum health.

Tooth position. Normally a tooth erupts during childhood in the center of its bony housing. But it can erupt outside of it, often resulting in little to no gum tissue growth around it. The best solution is to move the tooth to a better position within the bony housing through orthodontics. This in turn could stimulate gum growth.

Over-aggressive brushing. Ironically, gum recession could be the result of brushing, one of the essential hygiene tasks for dental health. Consistently brushing too hard can inflame and tear the tissues to the point they begin to recede. Brushing doesn’t require a lot of force to remove plaque: use gentle, circular motions and let the detergents and mild abrasives in your toothpaste do the rest.

Periodontal (gum) disease. This, by far, is the greatest cause for gum recession: an infection caused by built-up bacterial plaque. The weakened tissues begin to detach from the teeth and recede. Gum disease can be treated with aggressive plaque removal and supporting techniques; but it’s also highly preventable. Practicing daily brushing and flossing and regularly visiting your dentist for thorough cleanings and checkups are the best practices for keeping your gums as healthy as possible.

If you would like more information on gum recession, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gum Recession.”





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Braintree, MA Dentist
Dr. George Salem and Associates, PC
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Braintree, MA 02184
(781) 843-0660
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